Have a Comment? Play Nice.

The freedom of speech is underpinned by the imperative to communicate responsibly and respectfully. In an era where we are daily inundated with millions of pieces of information and opportunities to form opinions, sometimes our emotions get the better of us. Social media platforms have allowed us to communicate with each other and connect in ways that were never thought possible. But, the same platforms that give us so much freedom also offer the kind of anonymity that some use to bully those with whom they disagree.

This blog provides a way for us to share and exchange thoughts, ideas, theories, and other content in a respectful and unifying manner. Our hope is that we can foster a community that provides a space for all NCLR Affiliates, allies, supporters, activists, concerned citizens, and the general public to discuss, analyze, critique, and present solutions related to NCLR’s mission. NCLR’s Facebook page aims to be constructive and seeks to generate solutions-based conversation. We’ll agree to disagree when necessary, but we will always communicate with respect and acknowledge our common humanity.

NCLR expects all of our community participants to maintain a high level of sensitivity, particularly as it relates to race/ethnicity, appearance, gender, sexual orientation, religion, political beliefs, education and socioeconomic status.

Please note: This social media comment policy is subject to amendment or modification at any time to ensure that its continued use is consistent with its intended purpose as a limited forum.

Guidelines for Commenting

Please observe the following guidelines. Those who stray risk the deletion of their comments and/or access to the NCLR Blog.

1. Comments that address people using slurs or that negatively reference one’s race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, etc. are unacceptable and subject to immediate removal.

2. Personal attacks are disruptive to healthy dialogue and will be dealt with accordingly. We want to foster an environment in which people can discuss issues pertinent to their communities. At times, there will be a need to agree to disagree, but we ask that you remain respectful at all times and NEVER attack an individual.

3. Violent threats or suggested violence will result in immediate removal from the group.

4. Many comment threads are infested with trolls, people who post comments specifically to start a fight, defame, divide, distract, or otherwise detract from the overall function of the community. In instances of trolling, we ask that the community refrain from responding. Trolls will be subject to immediate removal from our community.

5. We discourage long, point-by-point arguments. These types of conversations tend to alienate the rest of the community and often stray from the initial purpose of the disagreement. You should keep in mind that you can always communicate with other bloggers.

6. Stereotypes are often divisive and offensive, and any such comment will be monitored closely. We encourage intelligent, enlightened conversation and careful articulation of one’s thoughts before posting. Again, sensitivity is paramount.

7. Avoid minimizing or denying the importance of comments/posts from others. We all have our individual priorities and beliefs; please respect this and act accordingly. Disagreement can take place without making others feel that their stance is less than important. Instances of minimizing will result first in a warning, and subsequent occurrences will subject the user to removal from the community.

8. If most or all of your comments are repetitive and off topic, we reserve the right to remove you from the community. Comments that are blatantly off topic or repeated will be deleted. We will be strictly monitoring those who “hijack” the forum to advance their own agenda; such users are subject to removal from the community. We always encourage thought-provoking posts. Please read and reflect on the post or comment before offering your commentary. Repeated transgressions will result in removal from the community.

9. Disagreement with comments is natural and encouraged. However, if you take offense to a comment, please address the commenter clearly and respectfully.

10. Please do not use the comments section to air complaints, whether about a post, a particular comment, or the moderation of our page. Please address all such concerns to news@nclr.org.

Again, we are a solutions-oriented community and welcome disagreement, but we want to take every opportunity to expand the conversation. Dissent without a proposed solution does no good for any of us.

12. Do not use this blog community for self-promotion. There are exceptions where posts might simultaneously advance the conversation while also promoting. The assessment of such instances is left to the page moderator.

13. Last but not least, we want to remind you that this is YOUR community. We welcome your participation and contributions to all threads. We ask that you do your part to adhere to the guidelines we’ve set and encourage others to do the same. Please email news@nclr.org if you have questions or concerns.

4 thoughts on “Have a Comment? Play Nice.

  1. I have a daughter a freshman at Warsaw High School in Missouri. She has been attacked by a football player,he choked and slapped her, nothing was done to him, yesterday a girl attacked her, pushing her and then the girl hit her, my daughter defended herself and was suspended from school. she has taken all the racial comments and all the derogatory comments and bulling from this group of girls since the 6th grade, she has talked to school staff numinous times. nothing has ever been done to stop these girls and at times boys from doing this. I need help from the Latino civil rights group, to stop what I believe is racial motivated attacks on her. Thank you for the help I know will come.

    • Jacki thanks for sharing your daughter’s story with us and our hearts go out to both of you. We will email you separately to talk about how we might be able to help.

  2. PLEASE SHARE WITH YOUR NETWORK. THANK YOU.

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    NCRC’s Annual Conference is the largest national gathering of community non-profits, policymakers, government officials, small businesses, labor, environment, media, and academia–all focused on how together we can create a more just economic framework to improve the lives of American families, our workers, our older adults, our children and our environment, while strengthening global access to credit and capital.

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  3. My immigration case can help you and other people to make positive solutions to US Immigration System. My immigration case involves the will (wish and intention), civil liveries, civil rights, 14 & 11 Admement and Due Process of law of a citizen from Puerto Rico. My case will provide information for a problem not known by US Citizens and your administration.

    Back ground: When US Citizenship stepparent filed a petition for his stepson but died before the date of approval of the petition. The petition becomes no longer valid. The US Citizen has no living relative who could continue with the immigration process of his stepson.

    “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction!” said former US President Ronal Reigan.

    From Julio (US Citizen from Puerto Rico from 1920 generation) to his son Javier (born in Mexico generation 1977) is now disfranchised. The freedoms of the first generation of families are in danger because they are not allowed to finish the process of US immigration because the petitioner passed away and US Immigration Officer did not make the time to approve the case! The current US Immigration law has failed to protect the sons of US Citizens who marry a person who do not have a US Citizenship but have a legal residency in the US.

    Case: The (Julio) US Citizen was born in Puerto Rico and married a woman from Mexico (Francisca). She had two children under age (Javier and Roberto). Francisca was a legal US resident with a Green card. Julio and Francisca married in Los Angeles County 1986. Julio passed away of Esophageal Cancer 08/16/1995. US Immigration programed an appointment for Julio in June 25, 1995. By Executive Sentence Dictated in Mexico on 08/30/1995 by the Second Court of this city Julio recognized Javier as his legitimate son. Javier mother passed away from cancer in 1999. Javier filled an appeal to US Immigration department but the appeal was denied by District Director, Los Angeles California in September 18, 2003. Is important to mention Julio and his family lived in California.

    Javier came here following US immigration law with a petition made by my father a US Citizen. The civil liberties, due process, 14 & 11 amendment and will of my father were ignored by us immigration system. The immigration system is giving the message that the rights from a US Citizen does not exit. Therefore marriage between a man (Puerto Rico) and a woman (Mexican) are less. This gives the effect to disfranchise the children of Puerto Rican/Mexican married legally in California.

    Javier case can help you to present facts and problems of US Immigration and create dialog to find solutions. Javier came to this country following his family unit respecting the US Immigration law. Javier studied at Huntington Park Highs School (LAUSD) and attended Cypress Junior College. Javier got the opportunity to work with California School system, non-profit organizations and business sector. Javier need help to find a solution to his immigration status
    My immigration case can help you and other people to make positive solutions to US Immigration System. My immigration case involves the will (wish and intention), civil liveries, civil rights, 14 & 11 Admement and Due Process of law of a citizen from Puerto Rico. My case will provide information for a problem not known by US Citizens and your administration.

    Back ground: When US Citizenship stepparent filed a petition for his stepson but died before the date of approval of the petition. The petition becomes no longer valid. The US Citizen has no living relative who could continue with the immigration process of his stepson.

    “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction!” said former US President Ronal Reigan.

    From Julio (US Citizen from Puerto Rico from 1920 generation) to his son Javier (born in Mexico generation 1977) is now disfranchised. The freedoms of the first generation of families are in danger because they are not allowed to finish the process of US immigration because the petitioner passed away and US Immigration Officer did not make the time to approve the case! The current US Immigration law has failed to protect the sons of US Citizens who marry a person who do not have a US Citizenship but have a legal residency in the US.

    Case: The (Julio) US Citizen was born in Puerto Rico and married a woman from Mexico (Francisca). She had two children under age (Javier and Roberto). Francisca was a legal US resident with a Green card. Julio and Francisca married in Los Angeles County 1986. Julio passed away of Esophageal Cancer 08/16/1995. US Immigration programed an appointment for Julio in June 25, 1995. By Executive Sentence Dictated in Mexico on 08/30/1995 by the Second Court of this city Julio recognized Javier as his legitimate son. Javier mother passed away from cancer in 1999. Javier filled an appeal to US Immigration department but the appeal was denied by District Director, Los Angeles California in September 18, 2003. Is important to mention Julio and his family lived in California.

    Javier came here following US immigration law with a petition made by my father a US Citizen. The civil liberties, due process, 14 & 11 amendment and will of my father were ignored by us immigration system. The immigration system is giving the message that the rights from a US Citizen does not exit. Therefore marriage between a man (Puerto Rico) and a woman (Mexican) are less. This gives the effect to disfranchise the children of Puerto Rican/Mexican married legally in California.

    Javier case can help you to present facts and problems of US Immigration and create dialog to find solutions. Javier came to this country following his family unit respecting the US Immigration law. Javier studied at Huntington Park Highs School (LAUSD) and attended Cypress Junior College. Javier got the opportunity to work with California School system, non-profit organizations and business sector. Javier need help to find a solution to his immigration status

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